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  • Sea slug crawling on the sea floor. Caption: in the nervous systems of slugs and other animals.

    While the human brain and nervous system are wired with hundreds of billions of nerve cells, or neurons, sea slugs can get by with tens of thousands. Ironically, sea slugs reveal a lot about the chemistry of the human brain and nervous system. In fact, they are ideal as study subjects for research on learning, memory, and how neurons control behavior. With support from the National Science Foundation, analytical chemist Jonathan Sweedler and his team at the University of Illinois are working to develop new measurement tools that enable insights into the function of individual cells in the central nervous systems of slugs and other animals in order to uncover novel neurochemical pathways. Part of the National Science Foundation Series “Science Nation.”

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Wired

    • Video
    Closeup of a human eye. Caption: of specialized cells called receptors

    As millions of receptors in the human nervous system respond automatically to light, sound, touch, and smell, and send information to the brain, the body acts. Explores a condition amputees experience known as "phantom pain" or "phantom limb." Also explains how the blind "see" words with the receptors in their hands.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • People observing what is happening inside a room with something on an operating table. Caption: to support the survival of endangered species.

    Contains 8 segments: "Matter and Energy for Life," "Ecosystems," "Populations," "Homeostasis: The Body in Balance," "Inheritance," "Behavior and the Nervous System," "Biodiversity," and "The Biosphere." Students have opportunities to become involved in hands-on activities. Supports the learning of key concepts in biology in tandem with the textbook also offered by the publisher.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Woman in a wheelchair with straps around her legs and a control device in her hands while someone crouches in front of her in a lab setting. Caption: It was designed to reactivate her paralyzed limbs.

    Functional electrical stimulation technology (FES) is designed to interface technology with muscles and nerves in an attempt to restore some level of function for people with central nervous system disabilities. Visits several experimental programs that are using implanted electrodes, controlled by external computer devices, to enable people with spinal cord injuries to stand, transfer, and, under controlled conditions, even walk.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Illustration of a human skull with the eyeballs still present. Caption: The human eye is an organ -- an exquisite sensory organ --

    Touch, taste, smell, hearing, and sight: the human body's five major senses. They are senses that have evolved independently over millions of years but are brought together by our marvelous central nervous system into the most refined way of interacting with the environment of any species on the planet. Join Dr. Mark Reisman as he provides you with a look at the anatomy and physiology of each of these sensory systems and shows how the brain uses them to produce what we call being human.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Person wearing dark glasses. Caption: The next person we visit is a man whose eye was replaced

    Cyborg technology is a revolutionary development in rehabilitation medicine. It allows the brain and nervous system to manipulate specially engineered devices that help people regain the use of impaired body function. Once a dream of science fiction, this revolutionary technology is now becoming a reality. Demostrates a deep brain stimulation that can help stop the violent shaking of victims of Parkinson's disease. Presents two professors from the State University of New York and Duke University who discuss their cutting-edge research.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Outline of a person with the hypothalamus in their brain highlighted. 98.6 degrees. Caption: The hypothalamus monitors the temperature inside the body

    The endocrine system maintains the body's delicate chemical balance. Describes the location, function, and effects of the major endocrine glands, and notes their close relationship to the nervous system. Some discussion of diabetes and hormonal imbalances.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Shirtless muscular man flexing his bicep. Caption: When the muscle fibers fire and contract,

    Investigates the major body systems that are important during physical activity: the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems. Examines each of these systems, their parts, their functions, and how they work. Also, explores the contribution and interaction of the systems when we exercise and while we are rest.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Computer screen showing a satellite map with population data. Caption: We can identify the number of people

    United States Geological Survey geologist, Angie Diefenbach, describes how she uses GIS (Geographic Information Systems) software to study volcanic erupts and their impacts on society.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • A diagram of a lock in the backdrop of a neuron. Caption: So, a  neuroethicist looks at the privacy implications.

    What is neuroethics? Tim Brown, doctoral candidate and research assistant at University of Washington's Center for Neurotechnology, explains this concept. Part of the "Ask a Scientist" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Scientists working in a lab. Caption: What's distinctive about scientific knowledge?

    Is psychology a science? Two case studies are given to explore the different ways to approach psychology, and to help students formulate their own opinions. Part of the "Core Concepts in Psychology" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • illustration depicts a close knitted structure of the nerves. Caption: are now hardwired in because we use them so often.

    What is neuroplasticity? CEO and founder of TAO Connect, Sherry Benton, explains the brain's ability to reorganize itself by forming new neural connections throughout life. Part of the "Ask a Scientists" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Bill Nye holding an infant. Caption: You, she, and I have the same number of brain cells

    Bill Nye explores facts about the brain, zeroing in on some of its functions, kinds of memory, optical illusions, and general information. Suggests activities and experiments that demonstrate the wonder of the brain.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • White bird with wings extended against a black background. Caption: One explanation has to do with contrast.

    On this episode, host Jason Silva investigates the ways memory can be both misled and improved. He also explains various types of data gathered from brain studies. Part of the "Brain Games Family Edition" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Lab equipment in background with illustration of connected neurons. Caption: glia activate and help fix the neurons

    Hannah Laccarino, a graduate student in Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT, answers questions about the importance of brain cells. She also discusses what happens to the brain cells not used. Part of the "#askMIT" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Illustration of the human heart. Caption: and serotonin, which causes blood vessels to narrow,

    Physical activity and quality sleep are both vital for healthy bodies, as well as healthy brains. Viewers learn the relationship between activity, boredom, and sleep and how each plays a role in healthy development of children. Part of "The Brain" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Person shining a light into someone's eye and looking closely at it. Caption: A migraine doesn't feel like a typical headache.

    This segment tackles migraine headaches and how they can interfere with daily life. Experts also discuss the triggers associated with migraines such as caffeine, dehydration, and stress. Part of the "Teen Kids News" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Closeup of the outside of a human brain. Caption: The brain and spinal cord carry the instructions

    Looks at nerve signals and how they are transmitted. Provides an overview of nerve messages in reflex activities at both the chemical and electrical levels as well as the activities of networks of nerve cells in contact. NOTE: Contains some nudity.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Closeup of the human eye. Caption: which regulates the amount of light entering the eye.

    Presents three key biological concepts about sensory responses and tropisms: the eye, nervous system responses, and plant tropisms. Each concept is illustrated with a variety of experiments and computer animation to illuminate what is happening both visibly and at the molecular level. NOTE: Dissects a horse's eye to identify functions of each part.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Close up of a brown and white bunny in a cage. Caption: has been carried out on nonhuman animals.

    Animals have contributed to scientific advancements, but how ethical is it to use them in research? Viewers explore the legal and ethical issues concerning the use of animals in research. Part of the "Core Concepts in Psychology" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

Collections

3

Showing collections 1 to 3 of 3

  • Anatomy

    • Video
    • Image
    • PDF
    • Text Document
    • 2.5D Tactile Graphic

    Collection of anatomy resources

    A collection containing 21 resources, curated by Benetech

  • Vision

    • Image
    • Text Document
    • PDF
    • 2.5D Tactile Graphic
    • Video

    Resources related to vision

    A collection containing 12 resources, curated by Charles LaPierre

  • Biology

    • Video
    • Image
    • Text Document
    • PDF
    • 2.5D Tactile Graphic
    • 3D Model
    • Audio File

    Biology related concepts

    A collection containing 59 resources, curated by Benetech