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423

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  • Microscopic view of small, tube-like structures. Caption: Two kinds of cells make up the living world:

    Human beings, like every living organism, are driven by two inherent needs: to survive, and ultimately, to reproduce. To accomplish the goals of survival and reproduction, we have inherited bodies crafted by evolution so that every individual human organism is an organic super factory, a living machine made up of systems that process fuel, build products, repair damage, expel waste, and defend against invaders. Introduces the complex physiological systems of the human body: muscular movement, digestion, circulation, respiration, nerves, glands, immunity, and reproduction. Also, illustrates and explains the cellular basis of life and the importance of carbon in organic chemistry.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • A humanoid robot holding a drill. Caption: to continuously pay attention to his surroundings

    The smartest people in the world have spent millions of dollars trying to develop high-tech robots. Even though technology has come a long way, these humanoid robots are nowhere close to having the "brain" and motor control of a human. Why is that? A MIT scientist explains the motor control processes in the human brain, and how cutting-edge research is trying to implement it in robots. Part of the "Science Out Loud" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Illustration of a primate standing on two legs. Caption: Ardi is neither a chimp nor is she a human.

    Paleontologists have studied the fossil record of human evolution just like they have done for other major transitions, including the evolution of tetrapods from fish and the evolution of birds from dinosaurs. Sean Carroll and Tim White discuss the most important human fossils and how they illuminate key phases of human evolution, focusing in particular on three traits: larger brains, tool use, and bipedality.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Illustration of a human skull with the eyeballs still present. Caption: The human eye is an organ -- an exquisite sensory organ --

    Touch, taste, smell, hearing, and sight: the human body's five major senses. They are senses that have evolved independently over millions of years but are brought together by our marvelous central nervous system into the most refined way of interacting with the environment of any species on the planet. Join Dr. Mark Reisman as he provides you with a look at the anatomy and physiology of each of these sensory systems and shows how the brain uses them to produce what we call being human.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • An old car from the 1920's driving next to contemporary cars. Caption: The very first cars were powered by electricity.

    For centuries, land travel was restricted to how fast and far humans or animals could walk. In the 19th century, the invention of the bicycle transferred human energy to a set of wheels. During the Industrial Revolution, the invention of the steam engine led to the railroad, a change in transportation that created the tourist industry. In the early 20th century, the invention of the automobile forever changed how humans travel, and with the assembly line, Henry Ford forever changed how goods are manufactured.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Measuring cup. Eat the amount your body really needs. Measure out your portions. Caption: by measuring out your portions with measuring cups

    Nutritional disorders include any of the nutrient-related diseases and conditions that cause illness in humans. They may include deficiencies or excesses in the diet. Exercise and a healthy diet can help combat these disorders. Part of the "Human Nutrition" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Two cartoon characters. Human Body Systems.

    In this video, Pinky and Petunia discuss the 11 major organ systems in the human body. These include the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovasular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive system. Part of "The Amoeba Sisters" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Four jets trailing colored exhaust engaging in trick maneuvers. Caption: (narrator) A g-force is the force gravity has on your body.

    Thrill seeking, extreme sports, and even dangerous professions all push the human body to its limits. The question is: How much can the human body handle? Newer technology enables doctors to simulate stressful events on models and monitors. Then, with the help of science, new products can be created to assist the human body in these situations.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Illustration of a person with a large belly next to a bad of mega chips labeled party size and a stack of calories. Caption: can cause a person to be overweight,

    Students receive an overview of nutrition basics starting with an in-depth look at nutrients. This program also provides an overview of nutrition standards and guidelines. Part of the "Human Nutrition" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Illustration of a military person pointing to a chart with pictures of bananas, apples, and leafy greens. Caption: Choose foods that provide more potassium, dietary fiber, calcium, and vitamin D--

    This program provides an overview of the different types of foods. It also gives guidance on healthy eating. Students learn the difference between refined grain and whole grain. They also discuss the benefits of eating fruits and vegetables, how the body turns proteins into amino acids to build muscle and tissue, and the need to avoid processed foods. Part of the "Human Nutrition" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Person carefully handling a very small humanoid skull. Caption: that researchers dubbed "the hobbit."

    Anthropologists have made new fossil discoveries on Palau, an island country located in the western Pacific Ocean. But these fossils do not appear to be of animal origins. Could they belong to early humans? If so, scientists must answer the question of human variation. Segment of video from Wild Chronicles Series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Illustration of a cell and a molecule of NaCl. Made up mostly of water. Caption: The fluid around the cell contains sodium chloride

    Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients because they perform hundreds of roles in the body. There is a fine line between getting enough of these nutrients and getting too much. Eating a healthy diet remains the best way to get sufficient amounts of vitamins and minerals. In addition to vitamins and minerals, water is also essential for the optimal performance and regulation of the human body. Part of the "Human Nutrition" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Person speaking. Caption: Calcium is another mineral that is especially important

    This program explores the psychology of eating and food as a cultural attribute. It also discusses various alternative diets and cautions dieters to thoroughly investigate any diet before subscribing to it. Part of the "Human Nutrition" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • An illustration depicts the sinuses present in a human skull.

    In this episode, host Joe Hanson discusses how the human body is full of design flaws. He argues that these flaws are due to evolution and that the human body is still evolving. Part of the "It's Okay to Be Smart" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Blurry city in background. Hearing.

    Technology and science are working to restore, replace, and supercharge the powerful human sense of hearing. Meet a man who is blind whose hearing is so acute that he can navigate a bicycle by the sound of the echo of a click. This episode also highlights some of the advances made in hearing aids and work being done by researchers to use sound to improve cognition and memory during sleep. Part of the “Human + The Future of Our Senses” series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Flock of large birds landing on the shore and in the water. Caption: the wildlife simply adapts to the new conditions.

    This program from the acclaimed PBS Nature series, "Forces of the Wild," looks at man's constant attempt to adapt the Earth to his own needs without concern of the consequences. Earth is a self-regulating organism full of forces impossible to control. Water is one force, creating life where there is none and destroying life when it can't be tamed. Narrated by James Earl Jones.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Map of the world with central and southern Africa highlighted. Arrows indicate movement from there to all areas of the globe. Caption: after the first homo sapiens left Africa 100,00 years ago.

    Paleo-anthropologists believe Homo sapiens evolved in Africa 100-200 thousand years ago, and eventually moved out of Africa to populate the globe. But, how can researchers trace the specifics of that human migration? With support from the National Science Foundation, Florida Museum of Natural History Mammologist David Reed has undertaken a novel approach. He studies the genetic diversity and evolution of the human parasite that hitched a ride the whole way: lice.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Photo of deers captured in a photo trap.

    Do animals change their behavior when humans hike through the forest or move next door? Scientists looking to answer this question are relying on webcams. They are hoping to gather data to pinpoint adaptations in animal behavior related to human interaction.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Blurry city in background. Touch.

    The sense of touch is an invisible force of human nature. Today, touch is undergoing a revolution. Science has pushed the limits of nature thanks to technological touch. It is now possible to touch objects virtually that are invisible or located thousands of kilometers away. A simple movement in the air is enough to control them. Medical technology has even succeeded in giving a sense of touch to bionic limbs made of metal, plastic, wires, and processors. Slowly but surely, prostheses are starting to perform better than natural limbs. Part of the “Human + The Future of Our Senses” series.

    (Source: DCMP)

  • Illustration of a grazing cow. Greetings from the farm… Caption: (man) Like many foods,

    Animals and plants provide the food supply for humans. Consumers have many choices regarding how they obtain their food. Some may choose to eat organic. Some decide to source their food locally. Others take a hard look at the additives and preservatives in foods. Some choose to garden. Part of the "Human Nutrition" series.

    (Source: DCMP)

Collections

6

Showing collections 1 to 6 of 6

  • Anatomy

    • Video
    • Image
    • PDF
    • Text Document
    • 2.5D Tactile Graphic

    Collection of anatomy resources

    A collection containing 21 resources, curated by Benetech

  • Biology

    • Video
    • Image
    • Text Document
    • PDF
    • 2.5D Tactile Graphic
    • 3D Model
    • Audio File

    Biology related concepts

    A collection containing 59 resources, curated by Benetech

  • Animals

    • Video

    Resources to teach younger students about animals

    A collection containing 58 resources, curated by DIAGRAM Center

  • Vision

    • Image
    • Text Document
    • PDF
    • 2.5D Tactile Graphic
    • Video

    Resources related to vision

    A collection containing 12 resources, curated by Charles LaPierre

  • Chemistry

    • Video
    • Image
    • 2.5D Tactile Graphic
    • PDF
    • Text Document
    • Simulation

    A collection of Chemistry related resources

    A collection containing 67 resources, curated by Benetech

  • PhET Simulations

    • Simulation

    A collection of simulations from PhET.

    A collection containing 15 resources, curated by Charles LaPierre